Emmastraat 58, Caecilia

Both Franz and his brother Willy were born in Amsterdam. The family moved to the Emmastraat 58 in Hilversum some time before 1914. Even though Franz is sometimes listed on other addresses (Rotterdam, Amsterdam, the second I can explain) he lived at the Emmastraat until he died. Or so I thought!

Nowadays there is no Emmastraat 58, the house is gone. I looked around a bit for what happened.

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Johanna Farwerck-Borrius (1901-1992)

Referring to Carl Wilhelm Farwerck‘s wife, I realised that I never really looked at Johanna. I didn’t even have her years of birth and death present when I needed them. Time to change this.

It wasn’t too difficult to find out when Johanna lived. She was born in Amsterdam on 3 May 1901 and she passed away on 15 May 1992 in Hilversum. At the time she had children, grand children and grand grand children. Thus says the advertisement of her mourning, so at the end of this text.

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Edited Rotary

It seems that three books have been written about the Hilversum Rotary Club at three different anniversaries. The first (which I don’t have) was published in 1953, the second in 1988 and the third in 2003.

Both later books seem expansions of the previous, so the last one, doesn’t add anything to the period I’m interested in (It does give more insight into Rotary in general). The 2003 book has texts from the 1988 book, but they didn’t republish them all. It seems that the same can be said about the 1988 versus 1954 book.

In any case, I have edited the Rotary article a bit and added a strange image.

For completeness, these are the named books.

  • Gedenkboek Rotary Club Hilversum 1928-1953 compiled by H. Gorter (1954).
  • Rotary Club Hilversum 1928 – 1988 by different authors (1988);
  • Rotary Club Hilversum Lustrumbundel 1928 – 2003 by Bart Admiraal (2003).

Then we have the more general book that I found (and Hoogenboom too) which I have used before:

  • Rotary voor, tijdens en na de Tweede Wereldoorlog by D.M. Jaeger (2003).

Archaeology

This is a subject I want to have a better look at, but I’m still hunting for information. Here are some preliminary results.

Archaeology in the Netherlands officially ‘exists’ since 1818 when it became a study at the University of Leiden and the National Museum for Antiquities was founded in the same city. This didn’t immediately lead to a boom of archaeological investigations in the country though. In Farwerck’s time, especially after WWII, there was a growing number of amateur archaeologists and interested people who started to unite and to cooperate with the finally growing number of professional archaeologists. That is when things start to get interesting regarding Farwerck.

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National Archive

After the war, people who have been active in the Nationaal Socialistische Beweging (‘National Socialist Movement’, N.S.B.), have been investigated to see if they should be prosecuted. Farwerck was of course one of them.

One biography quotes from these files and it took me quite a while before I located them and then again some time before I managed to check them myself.

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Egbert Smedes

Quite by accident I ran into a possibly interesting person: Egbert Jacob Smedes. Smedes was born in 1889 in Assen, Netherlands and he passed away in 1975 in Haarlem, Netherlands. He was a teacher and clerk, “modern Humanist” and wrote several books.

When I was looking for something non-Farwerck related I ran into a fairly long article by Smedes in the Indisch Maçonniek Tijdschrift (‘Indian Masonic Periodical’) 1938/9. The text has the catching title Is Onze Loge een Directe Voorzetting van de Oud-Germaansche Gilde? (‘Is our lodge a direct continuation of the old-Germanic guild?’).

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Farwerck the photographer

In the biography I say that for a long time Farwerck travelled a lot for his work and he used the occasions to make photographs that later appeared in his books. Then I thought to see if he gives sources for his images to check if this is true. He does.

In his final work, Farwerck has two-and-a-half pages with sources for his images. This list contains book titles and then the numbers for the images that he used are mentioned. So you get for example: “Richard Beitl Deutsche Volkskunde, Berlin 1933: 49, 61” Yes I said two-and-a-half pages with such lines, so that are a lot of sources. One such line is for Farwerk himself. 15 Images out of 265 are photos shot by himself. A line up, two photos of “F. de Fremery, Hilversum” are mentioned.

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Esperanto

Here we have another interesting and elusive subject. In her book about the Dutch federation of Le Droit Humain, Ank Engel writes that Farwerck laboured for the cause of Esperanto. I have run into more references to Esperanto, so how exactly did Farwerck fit in that picture?

Esperanto is a language constructed from (mostly Indo-European) languages that is supposed to be easy to learn and hence become an international language. The Pole L.L. Zahendorf developed it in the late 19th century and in the first decades, it was quite successfull.

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Jan Thierens

In one of his 1953 books, Farwerck thanked E.J.F. Thierens for his help. Thierens was Farwerck’s successor as Grand Commander of Le Droit Humain when Farwerck left to join the National Socialist Movement. Apparently, over two decades along the line, the two were still in contact. So who was this E.J.F. Thierens?

Thierens’ full names are Elie Johannes François, Jan in short. He was born in 1882, so he was a little older than Farwerck. Thierens died in 1967.

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Belief

In 1928, Reverend Van Duyl and carpet manufacturer Farwerck got to know each other closely. Not through religion, because Farwerck was not religiously active anywhere. On a spiritual level, he was completely and exclusively committed to (mixed-gender) freemasonry. (1)

Thus says Hans Hoogenboom (2). By now we know that this is not true. In 1921 Farwerck was active in the very spiritual Universal Sufism order. Also we have very strong suggestions that Farwerck was active in the Theosophical Society. Both are far more spiritual than the Masonic order that Farwerck was member of. In basis at least. Freemasonry is a system of symbolism that every member can interpret in his/her own way. Le Droit Humain in Farwerck’s time was very Theosophical (that could be how he got to know of mixed gender Freemasonry), but Farwerck joined the first ‘non-Theosophical’ lodge. Perhaps he did interpret the system ‘Theosophically’, but that is something I have no indications of.

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