Some remarks

Here is an example of Farwerck as Masonic historian. Farwerck published texts in a periodical called Bouwsteenen which was made available by two of his Masonic brothers. Later the subtitle was changed and another editor turned the periodical in a much less Masonic publication. Farwerck contributed but one text to this second version, a reaction to a text written by the new editor himself. Farwerck shows himself a well-read and critical writer.

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Kabbalah and Freemasonry

This is the oldest text of Farwerck that I know. It was published in an internal publication of the Dutch federation of Le Droit Humain in 1922. I only have photos of the text. I tried ‘to OCR’ them online and then threw the text through Google translator. Of course I have made some corrections, but the text won’t be a perfect translation of a century old Dutch text.

Farwerck used quite a few abbreviations. Instead of translating them to English abbreviations I just gave the English terms for most of them. Terms such as “lesser lights” or “Sr. Warden” aren’t that exciting anymore I think.


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Nick Schors (1925-2014)

Another interesting character who somehow crossed the life of Farwerck.

As you can see on the right, Schors owned books previously owned by Farwerck. I know a few such example. Schors’ ex-libris says: “Librairie des Sciences Occultes, W.N. Schors” (‘library of occult sciences’) and his address in Amsterdam.

This is not the only connection between the two, Schors also published a book of Farwerck. That is to say, in 1976, so after Farwerck died, he republished Farwerck’s first book from 1927 with an alternative cover. Schors (re)published more books from the publishers Duwaer and Van Ginkel who published Farwerck’s debut.

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Glasfabriek Leerdam

Perhaps not the most interesting subject, but still a little.

Glassfactory “Leerdam” started as “Jeekel, Mijnssen & Co.” in 1875. “Leerdam” is not only the name of the factory, but also the place where the factory stood.

In 1912 the Theosophist Petrus Marinus Cochius (1874 – 1938) became director. Under Cochius the factory went more into an ‘artsy’ director which was fairly successful. Cochius had worked for the factory since 1895 and he was semi-director since 1903.

Economic difficulties caused Cochius to have disagreements with the members of the committee early 1930, but remained in his function for the better of the factory. The committee members were replaced in September 1930. Farwerck was appointed together with H. Hamming, W. Schermerhorn, H. v.d. Vegte and J.M.A. Wynaendts van Resandt. Other members were appointed too, one of them the Theosophist Erns Louis (Tenno) Selleger (1876-1967).

A few years later the situation had improved and Cochius was of the opinion that he had worked with the committe “in great harmony”. In November 1933 he found it safe to lay down his function and chairman of the committee Farwerck gave a little speech and transferring the function to Hamming.

In the post-war hearings Farwerck uses the Leerdam factory a few times as an example of how he tried to make working conditions more social. Leerdam indeed had the system called “arbeidersgemeenschap” (‘workers society’). Basically it meant that the factory was low on cash, so they had the workers buy shares to increase the funds. This was in May 1933. The shares would be “collective possession”.

Newspapers were positive about this novel and social movement. Not all employers were, they actually turned in salary for a piece of paper. In any case, in 1939 the stocks were “liquidated”, but I’m not sure that the employers got their benefit payment. That said, the factory had been taken merged into a larger company by then.

So here we can connect Farwerck to the Theosophists Cochius and Selleger, yet only from 1930. Also I haven’t found out until when Farwerck stayed in function. The only information I can find is from the 1930’ies.

Emmastraat 58, Caecilia

Both Franz and his brother Willy were born in Amsterdam. The family moved to the Emmastraat 58 in Hilversum some time before 1914. Even though Franz is sometimes listed on other addresses (Rotterdam, Amsterdam, the second I can explain) he lived at the Emmastraat until he died. Or so I thought!

Nowadays there is no Emmastraat 58, the house is gone. I looked around a bit for what happened.

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Johanna Farwerck-Borrius (1901-1992)

Referring to Carl Wilhelm Farwerck‘s wife, I realised that I never really looked at Johanna. I didn’t even have her years of birth and death present when I needed them. Time to change this.

It wasn’t too difficult to find out when Johanna lived. She was born in Amsterdam on 3 May 1901 and she passed away on 15 May 1992 in Hilversum. At the time she had children, grand children and grand grand children. Thus says the advertisement of her mourning, so at the end of this text.

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Edited Rotary

It seems that three books have been written about the Hilversum Rotary Club at three different anniversaries. The first (which I don’t have) was published in 1953, the second in 1988 and the third in 2003.

Both later books seem expansions of the previous, so the last one, doesn’t add anything to the period I’m interested in (It does give more insight into Rotary in general). The 2003 book has texts from the 1988 book, but they didn’t republish them all. It seems that the same can be said about the 1988 versus 1954 book.

In any case, I have edited the Rotary article a bit and added a strange image.

For completeness, these are the named books.

  • Gedenkboek Rotary Club Hilversum 1928-1953 compiled by H. Gorter (1954).
  • Rotary Club Hilversum 1928 – 1988 by different authors (1988);
  • Rotary Club Hilversum Lustrumbundel 1928 – 2003 by Bart Admiraal (2003).

Then we have the more general book that I found (and Hoogenboom too) which I have used before:

  • Rotary voor, tijdens en na de Tweede Wereldoorlog by D.M. Jaeger (2003).

Archaeology

This is a subject I want to have a better look at, but I’m still hunting for information. Here are some preliminary results.

Archaeology in the Netherlands officially ‘exists’ since 1818 when it became a study at the University of Leiden and the National Museum for Antiquities was founded in the same city. This didn’t immediately lead to a boom of archaeological investigations in the country though. In Farwerck’s time, especially after WWII, there was a growing number of amateur archaeologists and interested people who started to unite and to cooperate with the finally growing number of professional archaeologists. That is when things start to get interesting regarding Farwerck.

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