House

Emmastraat 56, J.A. Alberdingk Thijm school

Some more about the school that moved in next door of the family Farwerck and eventually ate up the villa itself.

In 1912 Farwerck senior bought villa Caecilia at an auction. At least, it’s almost certain that he was the winner of the auction, otherwise he should have bought it from the winner immediately after. The address was Emmastraat 58. The family seemed to have moved in in 1914. Franz Farwerck would follow in 1916.

In 1878 the second owners of the villa built stables with living facilities. This building got as address Emmastraat 60. At the other side of Caecilia, there was another villa.

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Emmastraat 60

A closer look into the garden house.

In 1878 Villa Caecila got permission to build stables and a porch. I now notice that the newspaper says “with living facilities”. he main building was from 1875. Early 1875 the house was sold and in November of the same year the stables were added.

As we saw, when the family Farwerck bought the villa in 1912, they also got the stables (quite logically too). The personnel was then housed in these stables / extra house. Since I have seen the address Emmastraat 60 a few times, I was curious if the address would indeed be that house.

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Digging into Farwerck’s final years

Earlier I wrote about Farwerck’s house where he no longer lived when he died. Did he move in with the widow of his brother and her son at Wernerlaan 41 which is close to where he lived himself? Or did he move somewhere else?

And what did he do with all his possessions, such as his massive library? When you’ve lived in a villa for decades, you’re bound to have a lot of possessions. You don’t just add that to the belongings of the person whose house you move into? But then, Farwerck’s library was only auctioned two years after he passed away, so where was that library between 1967 and 1971 and when, how and to whom was it sold?

These questions remain open, but looking for answers did make me have to rewrite my text about the house Caecilia and add another one about the Wernerlaan. Click on the links above.

Wernerlaan 41

In my initial investigations into Emmastraat 58, the address where Farwerck lived most of his life, I had come to the temporary conclusion that the address on his mourning advertisement, Wernerlaan 41 where Johanna Farwerck-Borrius and one son lived at the time, might have been the former coach house. Looking further, this is nearly impossible for several reasons.

Emmastraat 58 initially seems to have had a lot of ground, see the maps in the other article. Large enough for a coach house to be built in 1898. In that coach house, the family Farwerck housed its personnel and later two sons of Willy Farwerck and Johanna Farwerck-Borrius moved in. This coach house is sometimes listed as Emmastraat 58, sometimes as Emmastraat 60. Unfortunately, I have not been able to find out where exactly this coach house was built.

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What happened to Farwerck’s library?

Some thing occurred to me. In my text about Farwerck’s house, I mention that the neighbouring school bought Farwerck’s house in 1967. He only passed away in 1969, so he had to move elsewhere. This elsewhere appears to have been a house close to his garden.

When Farwerck passed away, the main contact address was Wernerlaan 41 (see mourning advertisement) and his brother’s widow and one of their sons as main contact. Does that mean that Farwerck lived there? Mentioned separately, but also living in Hilversum are Willy Farwerck’s son K.J. Farwerck and his wife Th.W.C. Farwerck-Hoolboom. Hoolboom was involved in some of Farwerck’s activities (Thule and Nehalennia).

Could Farwerck have moved in with the widow of his brother or with a son of his brother?

It must have been quite an ordeal to move the contents of a villa into a another house in which other people already lived. It was not likely to be very empty. Perhaps Farwerck sold much of his possessions, but apparently not his library, as this was only auctioned in 1971.

This is a bit strange though. Even is Farwerck moved in with family late 1967 and he died in March 1969 he would have lived there for a year or a year and a half. You would expect ‘stuff to settle’ in that time. But how and why did the family decide to get rid off the library a year after Farwerck’s passing? Money problems? Making room? Perhaps the library has been stored boxed up at the attic all this time? The auction listed 1526 items, so that’s not just a box of books (and perhaps not all books were auctioned). What exactly happened?

Also I’d love to find out why and how this auction came to be and where all these items went.

Emmastraat 58, Caecilia

Both Franz and his brother Willy were born in Amsterdam. In 1914 a part of the family moved to the Emmastraat 58 in Hilversum. Franz only moved there in 1916 after having lived in Rotterdam for a few years. Once in Hilversum, Farwerck had lived at the Emmastraat until he died. Or so I thought!

Nowadays there is no Emmastraat 58, the house is gone.

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