Category Archives: additional information

Willem Nijs (1902-1961)

A great find from a fellow Farwerck investigator.

Farwerck had al least two ex-libris bookplates, a Masonic one and one that is often called “alchemical”. In the biography I refer to a Facebook post of the Ritman Library who had the “alchemical” ex-libris in an exhibition in 2015 (1). The post says: “The designer of the present bookplate, who signed with the initials ‘W.F.N.’, is unknown (suggestions are welcome).

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Nick Schors (1925-2014)

Another interesting character who somehow crossed the life of Farwerck.

As you can see on the right, Schors owned books previously owned by Farwerck. I know a few such example. Schors’ ex-libris says: “Librairie des Sciences Occultes, W.N. Schors” (‘library of occult sciences’) and his address in Amsterdam.

This is not the only connection between the two, Schors also published a book of Farwerck. That is to say, in 1976, so after Farwerck died, he republished Farwerck’s first book from 1927 with an alternative cover. Schors (re)published more books from the publishers Duwaer and Van Ginkel who published Farwerck’s debut.

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Glasfabriek Leerdam

Perhaps not the most interesting subject, but still a little.

Glassfactory “Leerdam” started as “Jeekel, Mijnssen & Co.” in 1875. “Leerdam” is not only the name of the factory, but also the place where the factory stood.

In 1912 the Theosophist Petrus Marinus Cochius (1874 – 1938) became director. Under Cochius the factory went more into an ‘artsy’ director which was fairly successful. Cochius had worked for the factory since 1895 and he was semi-director since 1903.

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Emmastraat 58, Caecilia

Both Franz and his brother Willy were born in Amsterdam. The family moved to the Emmastraat 58 in Hilversum some time before 1914. Even though Franz is sometimes listed on other addresses (Rotterdam, Amsterdam, the second I can explain) he lived at the Emmastraat until he died. Or so I thought!

Nowadays there is no Emmastraat 58, the house is gone. I looked around a bit for what happened.

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Johanna Farwerck-Borrius (1901-1992)

Referring to Carl Wilhelm Farwerck‘s wife, I realised that I never really looked at Johanna. I didn’t even have her years of birth and death present when I needed them. Time to change this.

It wasn’t too difficult to find out when Johanna lived. She was born in Amsterdam on 3 May 1901 and she passed away on 15 May 1992 in Hilversum. At the time she had children, grand children and grand grand children. Thus says the advertisement of her mourning, so at the end of this text.

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Archaeology

This is a subject I want to have a better look at, but I’m still hunting for information. Here are some preliminary results.

Archaeology in the Netherlands officially ‘exists’ since 1818 when it became a study at the University of Leiden and the National Museum for Antiquities was founded in the same city. This didn’t immediately lead to a boom of archaeological investigations in the country though. In Farwerck’s time, especially after WWII, there was a growing number of amateur archaeologists and interested people who started to unite and to cooperate with the finally growing number of professional archaeologists. That is when things start to get interesting regarding Farwerck.

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